1995 Formula One World Championship

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Defending world champion Michael Schumacher (pictured in 2005) won a second consecutive title with Benetton in his last year with the team.
Damon Hill finished as runner-up 33 points behind with Williams.
Hill's teammate, David Coulthard, finished the season ranked third, scoring his 1st win.
Nigel Mansell retired from Formula One after 15 seasons.

The 1995 FIA Formula One World Championship was the 49th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1995 Formula One World Championship for Drivers and the 1995 Formula One World Championship for Constructors, which were contested concurrently over a seventeen-race series that commenced on 26 March and ended on 12 November.

Michael Schumacher won his second consecutive Drivers' Championship, and Benetton won the Constructors' Championship, the first and only Constructors' title for the Benetton team. Schumacher won nine races en route to the championship, equalling the record set by Nigel Mansell in 1992. He also continued his rivalry with Williams-Renault driver Damon Hill, including collisions at the British and Italian Grands Prix.

Both those races were won by Schumacher's teammate Johnny Herbert, taking his first two F1 victories. Hill's Williams teammate, David Coulthard, claimed his first victory in Portugal, while Ferrari's Jean Alesi achieved his only F1 victory in Canada. Just like Honda in 1988, Renault engines won all but one race in this season.

Drivers and constructors[edit]

The following teams and drivers competed in the 1995 FIA Formula One World Championship. All teams competed with tyres supplied by Goodyear.[1][2]

Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine No Driver Rounds
United Kingdom Mild Seven Benetton Renault Benetton-Renault B195 Renault RS7 3.0 V10 1 Germany Michael Schumacher All
2 United Kingdom Johnny Herbert All
United Kingdom Nokia Tyrrell Yamaha Tyrrell-Yamaha 023 Yamaha OX10C 3.0 V10 3 Japan Ukyo Katayama 1–13, 15–17
Italy Gabriele Tarquini 14
4 Finland Mika Salo All
United Kingdom Rothmans Williams Renault Williams-Renault FW17
FW17B
Renault RS7 3.0 V10 5 United Kingdom Damon Hill All
6 United Kingdom David Coulthard All
United Kingdom Marlboro McLaren Mercedes McLaren-Mercedes MP4/10
MP4/10B
MP4/10C
Mercedes FO 110 3.0 V10 7 United Kingdom Mark Blundell 1–2, 5–17
United Kingdom Nigel Mansell 3–4
8 Finland Mika Häkkinen 1–14, 16–17
Denmark Jan Magnussen 15
United Kingdom Footwork Hart Footwork-Hart FA16 Hart 830 3.0 V8 9 Italy Gianni Morbidelli 1–7, 15–17
Italy Massimiliano Papis 8–14
10 Japan Taki Inoue All
United Kingdom MTV Simtek Ford[a] Simtek-Ford S951 Ford EDB 3.0 V8 11 Italy Domenico Schiattarella 1–5
12 Netherlands Jos Verstappen 1–5
Republic of Ireland Total Jordan Peugeot Jordan-Peugeot 195 Peugeot A10 3.0 V10 14 Brazil Rubens Barrichello All
15 United Kingdom Eddie Irvine All
United Kingdom Pacific Team Lotus Pacific-Ford PR02 Ford EDC 3.0 V8 16 France Bertrand Gachot 1–8, 15–17
Italy Giovanni Lavaggi 9–12
Switzerland Jean-Denis Delétraz 13–14
17 Italy Andrea Montermini All
France Junior Larrousse F1[b] Larrousse-Ford LH95 Ford ED 3.0 V8 19 France Christophe Bouchut None
20 France Éric Bernard None
Italy Parmalat Forti Ford Forti-Ford FG01 Ford EDD 3.0 V8 21 Brazil Pedro Diniz All
22 Brazil Roberto Moreno All
Italy Minardi Scuderia Italia Minardi-Ford M195 Ford EDM 3.0 V8 23 Italy Pierluigi Martini 1–9
Portugal Pedro Lamy 10–17
24 Italy Luca Badoer All
France Ligier Gitanes Blondes Ligier-Mugen-Honda JS41 Mugen-Honda MF-301 3.0 V10 25 Japan Aguri Suzuki 1–3, 9, 15–16
United Kingdom Martin Brundle 4–8, 10–14, 17
26 France Olivier Panis All
Italy Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 412T2 Ferrari 044/1 3.0 V12 27 France Jean Alesi All
28 Austria Gerhard Berger All
Switzerland Red Bull Sauber Ford Sauber-Ford C14 Ford ECA Zetec-R 3.0 V8 29 Austria Karl Wendlinger 1–4, 16–17
France Jean-Christophe Boullion 5–15
30 Germany Heinz-Harald Frentzen All

Background[edit]

There was a threat of a drivers' strike over the terms of the 1995 Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) Super Licences, which allowed the FIA to demand promotional appearances and forbade the drivers from criticising the championship. This was resolved by the governing body prior to the race, ensuring full driver participation.[3][4]

Team changes[edit]

Andrea Montermini, driving for Pacific Team Lotus
Vittorio Zoboli, test driver for Forti in 1995
1995 was the last year for team Simtek
  • At the end of the 1994 season, Team Lotus left F1 after 36 years in the sport, winning 6 Drivers' and 7 Constructors' Championships, with the team ceasing operations in January 1995. Shortly before the team closed doors, the team's assets were bought by David Hunt, brother of 1976 Formula One champion James Hunt, who later announced that the Lotus name would be used by Pacific Grand Prix under the name Pacific Team Lotus.
  • The Larrousse team, with drivers Éric Bernard and Christophe Bouchut, failed to turn up for any of the on-track sessions.[5][6] With French government aid not forthcoming, the team ran out of money. And with a 1995 chassis not yet built, team owner Gérard Larrousse elected to miss the first two rounds of the season in the hope of competing from the San Marino Grand Prix onwards.[7] No funding ever arrived and it was too late for them to build a car for the season.[8] There were talks with the DAMS Formula 3000 team, but Jean-Paul Driot, boss of DAMS, wanted to buy Larrousse and run the team themselves.[9] After a sponsor deal with Malaysian oil company Petronas also fell through,[10] Driot announced on 13 February that they had abandoned plans to enter F1 for 1995. He intended to return to Formula 3000 and prepare for an F1 bid in 1996.[11]
  • Formula 3000 team Forti made the step up to Formula One, with their Forti FG01 being the last F1 car to use a manual gearbox.[12]
  • The status and the ownership of Ligier was under scrutiny. When Martin Brundle signed with them for 1995, rumours spread that Tom Walkinshaw would take up the function of team boss, since Brundle and Walkinshaw had many successful collaborations in the past. Walkinshaw worked for Benetton in 1994 as Engineering Director[13]), but when that team was found to use an illegal fuel filter at the German Grand Prix, they were let off the hook, after promising to fire Walkinshaw and implementing major changes within the team. On the side of Benetton, this deal was negotiated by Flavio Briatore. However, since he was also the owner of Ligier, it seemed more like a promotion for Walkinshaw, albeit with a smaller team.[14] Furtermore, rivals compared the Ligier JS41 to the Benetton B195, the only apparent difference being the engine in each car.[15] Commenting on the design similarities, Walkinshaw said:

Mechanically it [the JS41] is totally different [from the B195] and structurally it is quite different as well. Aerodynamically, it's as close as we can make it to being the same. I don't know how you would end up with anything else if you take a core of engineers who have been working on the Benetton. Of course the damn thing looks the same. But if you go into the detail of the car, there is nothing interchangeable.[16]

  • The 1995 season saw a major reshuffle among the engine suppliers: Benetton ended their 7-year association with Ford Motor Company by switching to the Renault RS7 engines (which were the same used by Renault's business partner Williams F1 team). The contract with Ford was taken up by Sauber and they parted ways with long time partner Mercedes-Benz. McLaren then offered a new home for the Mercedes engine supplier, ending their relationship with Peugeot after just one season. Jordan took on the Peugeot engine deal, replacing their Hart contract. And so, finally, the Hart company moved teams to Footwork Arrows.
  • Pacific Racing replaced their 1993-spec Ilmor engines for customer Ford EDC engines.
  • Minardi had been expected to run with Mugen-Honda engines, but at the last minute, Ligier boss Flavio Briatore persuaded the Japanese engine supplier to supply his team, leaving Minardi in a mess. Their M195 was designed for the Mugen-Honda V10 and parts were already being made. The team then had to work flat out to build a brand new car with a Ford ED engine, tuned by Magneti Marelli. Team owner Giancarlo Minardi announced he was taking legal action against the Japanese supplier.[17]
  • The Simtek team went bankrupt on 1 June, after the fifth race of the season.

Driver changes[edit]

Mid-season changes[edit]

Tyrrell driver Ukyo Katayama (pictured during the British GP) was injured in Portugal and replaced by Gabriele Tarquini.

Calendar[edit]

Round Grand Prix Circuit Date
1 Brazilian Grand Prix Brazil Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo 26 March
2 Argentine Grand Prix Argentina Autódromo Oscar Alfredo Gálvez, Buenos Aires 9 April
3 San Marino Grand Prix Italy Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola 30 April
4 Spanish Grand Prix Spain Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Montmeló 14 May
5 Monaco Grand Prix Monaco Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo 28 May
6 Canadian Grand Prix Canada Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal 11 June
7 French Grand Prix France Circuit de Nevers Magny-Cours, Magny-Cours 2 July
8 British Grand Prix United Kingdom Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone 16 July
9 German Grand Prix Germany Hockenheimring, Hockenheim 30 July
10 Hungarian Grand Prix Hungary Hungaroring, Mogyoród 13 August
11 Belgian Grand Prix Belgium Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot 27 August
12 Italian Grand Prix Italy Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Monza 10 September
13 Portuguese Grand Prix Portugal Autódromo do Estoril, Estoril 24 September
14 European Grand Prix Germany Nürburgring, Nürburg 1 October
15 Pacific Grand Prix Japan TI Circuit, Aida 22 October[c]
16 Japanese Grand Prix Japan Suzuka Circuit, Suzuka 29 October
17 Australian Grand Prix Australia Adelaide Street Circuit, Adelaide 12 November
Sources:[25][26]

Background[edit]

The calendar was initially announced at the beginning of 1995, but there were doubts over the selected dates:[27]

On 6 February, a revised calendar was announced. However, some tracks still needed clearance to race.[28]

  • The Argentine Grand Prix moved to 9 April, despite the fact it had now received official clearance from FIA safety inspector Roland Bruynseraede. It gave the honor of being the season opener to Brazil.
  • The Pacific round was pushed back due to the earthquake, placing it just one week before the Japanese Grand Prix.
  • The European Grand Prix was moved forward seven days, leading to another space in the schedule of just one week.

Calendar changes[edit]

Regulation changes[edit]

Regulations from 1994[edit]

In the aftermath of the deaths of Roland Ratzenberger and Ayrton Senna, during the weekend of the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix,[29] a number of regulation were implemented as of the 1994 German Grand Prix, intended to increase safety of the cars and to limit their performance.[30] These regulations were formalised going into 1995:

  • The rear wing could not extend forward of the rear wheel centreline and rear wing elements could only occupy 70% of the space between 60 centimetres (24 in) and 95 centimetres (37 in) above the ground.
  • A 10 millimetres (0.39 in) skid block made of impregnated wood was affixed to the underside of every car and it was demanded to wear was only permitted up to 1 millimetre (0.039 in). This was done to force an increase in ride height and thus reduce ground effect advantages.

New regulations[edit]

More regulation changes followed before the start of the 1995 season:[30][31][32][33][34]

Power[edit]

The allowed engine capacity was reduced to 3 litres (down from 3.5 litres) and the description for the type of fuel that was allowed was stringently specified, to reach an approximate 100 100 brake horsepower (75 kW) reduction in power.

Aerodynamics[edit]

  • The cars' ride height was raised by 50 millimetres (2.0 in).
  • The flat-bottomed undertray which was made mandatory in 1983 was to now feature a large "stepped" section underneath each sidepod, raised about an inch higher and parallel to the wooden plank originally introduced in 1994.
  • The rear wing could not extend more than 80 cm (31 in) above the "reference plane" (bottom of the car) - this used to be 95 cm (37 in).
  • The front wing had to be at least 50 mm (2.0 in) above the bottom of the car, up from 40 mm (1.6 in).
  • The maximum width of the rear diffuser was brought down from 100 cm (39 in) to 30 cm (12 in).
  • The exclusion zones above the front and rear wheels, in which no wings or other body parts with aerodynamic influence could be placed, were extended.

All aerodynamic changes summed up were expected by reduce downforce by 30-40%.

Safety and other[edit]

  • Cars had to have impact absorbing side structures, which would have to undergo impact tests.
  • Frontal crash tests were now performed at 12 m/s (39 ft/s) instead of 11 m/s (36 ft/s).
  • Cockpit openings had to be larger and feature better headrest installations.
  • The survival cell had to extend higher alongside the driver.
  • The minimum weight of the cars was increased from 515 kilograms (1,135 lb) to 525 kilograms (1,157 lb) to account for the new safety measures, and then increased to 595 kilograms (1,312 lb) to include the driver. Prior to the first session of the season, all of the drivers were weighed to establish a reference weight, to be used on occasions when the two were weighed separately, or if the driver was unavailable to be weighed. As such, a small competitive advantage could be established if the driver attempted to register a weight as heavy as possible before the season and then getting their weight down to lower the total weight of the car on track.[13]

Season review[edit]

Pre-season[edit]

The Footwork FA16 during the 1995 British Grand Prix

The cars were still in various stages of development heading into the new season; the Footwork FA16 and Simtek S951 chassis arrived at the event with virtually no testing, having been completed shortly beforehand.[3][35]

Luckily for them and other teams that were expected to be fighting over last places, the withdrawal of teams Larrousse and Lotus dropped the number of participating cars to 26, guaranteeing all entrants of a race start, without the threat of failing to qualify, for the first time since the 1994 Canadian Grand Prix.

At the front of the field, Michael Schumacher for Benetton and Damon Hill for Williams were the favourites to battle for the Drivers' Championship, with Schumacher anticipating a "struggle" for the championship.[36] Bernard Dudot, Renault's Chief Engineer, said that he believed Benetton was less well-prepared than Williams, as the former team had just changed its engine supplier to Renault, whereas Williams had been in partnership with the company since 1989.[37]

McLaren were concerned about the standard refuelling equipment provided for 1995 by suppliers Intertechnique, having suffered a major leak in a test of the new rig outside of its factory. Intertechnique had redesigned the fuel equipment, which was used by all of the teams, in the wake of the pit lane fire suffered by driver Jos Verstappen during the previous year's German Grand Prix.[3] The new fuel rigs, in addition to being half the size of the 1994, also featured longer nozzles, and were designed to lock onto the car before any fuel could begin to flow.[38] Intertechnique traced the problem to a faulty valve within the equipment, which caused 10 kilograms (22 lb) of fuel to leak, and modified the parts accordingly.[39]

Rounds 1 to 4[edit]

1994 runner-up Damon Hill for Williams achieved pole position for the first race of the season in Brazil. Champion Michael Schumacher lined up in second in his Benetton. Hill had a bad start and was immediately overtaken by Schumacher.[40] They utilised different pit stop strategies and the battle was heating up until, on lap 31, the Williams driver spun off the track when his gearbox seized. Schumacher comfortably won the race ahead of Hill's teammate David Coulthard. Third place was contested by Mika Salo in the Tyrrell until he spun on lap 39, suffering from cramp in his hand, and was overtaken by Mika Häkkinen in the McLaren and the Ferraris of Gerhard Berger and Jean Alesi. After the second round pit stops, Berger took third place and stayed there.[41][42]

After the race, Schumacher and Coulthard were both disqualified, as the fuel sample taken from their cars after qualifying did not match the regulations. All classified drivers moved up two places and Berger was declared the victor.[43][44] However, a successful appeal by the two teams saw their drivers' results reinstated, since the illegal fuel did not offer a performance advantage.[45] Still, the teams did not receive any points for the Constructors' Championship and were $200,000. This division between car and driver was met with criticism.[36]>

For the second race in Argentina, Coulthard achieved pole position, the first of his career, with Hill and Schumacher behind him.[46] The start saw collisions between eight drivers and the race was suspended. On lap six of the restarted race, Coulthard's throttle failed, allowing Schumacher and Hill past, and leading to the Scot's retirement shortly after. During the pit stops, Hill grabbed the lead and Alesi took second place. Schumacher finished third.

Before the race in San Marino, it was Benetton's Michael Schumacher on pole position for the first time this season. Berger started second, much to the joy of the local tifosi. Hill started in fourth. Light rain was falling and teams faced a difficult choice in tyres. The first five drivers on the grid started on rain tyres and, after the start, were five seconds per lap quicker than the rest of the field. Rubens Barrichello, the only other driver on wet tyres, started in tenth in his Jordan and quickly got up to sixth. Things turned out in the pit stops: Schumacher crashed, coming out on his cold tyres, and Berger's car stalled, giving the lead to Damon Hill. Coulthard and Alesi fought hard over then-second place, but the over-eager Williams driver exceeded the pit lane speed limit and had to undertake a 10-second stop-go penalties. The podium order was Hill, Alesi, Berger.

In Spain, it was Schumacher on pole for the second time and he led from start to finish. On the last lap, Hill was in second, but when he suffered from a hydraulic problem, he crawled across the line in fourth. This allowed Schumacher's teammate Johnny Herbert through to second place, his first ever podium. Berger finished third, while Alesi and Coulthard retired.

After four races, Schumacher in the Benetton led the Drivers' Championship with 24 points, just one ahead of Hill in the Williams. Alesi and Berger in the Ferrari followed with 14 and 13 points, respectively. In the Constructors' Championship, Ferrari (27) led Williams (26) and Benetton (23).

Rounds 5 to 10[edit]

A bizarre incident in Saturday practice saw the Renault Clio safety car crash into Taki Inoue's stalled Footwork.[47]

On the narrow streets of Monaco, Damon Hill for Williams qualified in pole position.[48][49] Championship leader Michael Schumacher in the Benetton started next to him. David Coulthard (Williams), Gerhard Berger and Jean Alesi (both Ferrari) completed the top five, but the three collided going in the first corner.[50][51] The track was blocked and the race was suspended.[52][53][51] At the second start, the top drivers remained in order, but during the pit stops, Hill fell back behind Schumacher and Alesi. The Ferrari then crashed whilst attempting to avoid Martin Brundle, who had spun. Coulthard retired, so the top three at the finish was Schumacher, Hill, Berger.

This was the last race for the Simtek team, who withdrew from the championship because they ran out of budget.

Jean Alesi (Ferrari won the 1995 Canadian Grand Prix

In Canada, Michael Schumacher achieved pole position, the 100th for a Renault-powered F1 car,[54] and led away comfortably, until on lap 57, an electrical problem forced him into the pits. He was stationary for 70 seconds to change his steering wheel and perform an on-board computer adjustment. He recovered to fifth position at the finish. Jean Alesi went on to win the race on his 31st birthday. This would be his only career victory and also marked the last time to date that a car with a V12 engine won. After several other front-runners encountered problems late in the race, the Jordans of Rubens Barrichello and Eddie Irvine completed the surprising podium.

Just like in Monaco, Hill started on pole position in France, but lost out to second-starting Schumacher during the pit stops. His teammate Coulthard started and finished in third.

Johnny Herbert (Benetton won the 1995 British Grand Prix

During the British Grand Prix, championship rivals Hill and Schumacher clashed for the first time. Hill had started from pole,[55][56] while Schumacher fell behind third-starting Alesi. As happened regularly this season, Schumacher took the lead by only needing one pit stop, compared to Hill's two.[57] But when the Williams tried to repass the Benetton, the two collided and retired.[58] This promoted their teammates Johnny Herbert and David Coulthard to the front. Coulthard took the lead, but incurred a stop-go penalty for speeding in the pit lane.[59] Herbert won the first race of his career, ahead of Jean Alesi in the Ferrari.[60]

Two weeks later, Michael Schumacher won his home race, the German Grand Prix. Damon Hill had achieved pole position once again, but this time, spun off on the second lap as a result of driveshaft failure. David Coulthard finished second, Gerhard Berger was third, recovering from a 10-second stop-go penalty for jumping the start.

The 1995 Hungarian Grand Prix was a grand slam for Damon Hill: he won from pole position and set the fastest lap. Coulthard finished second and Berger third. Michael Schumacher was classified three laps down, suffering from fuel pump issues. During the race, Taki Inoue had his second coming together with the safety car. This time, he himself was hit by the Tatra 623 when running over to his Footwork with a fire extinguisher. He suffered minor injuries to his leg.[61][62]

In the Drivers' Championship, Michael Schumacher was leading with 56 points, ahead of Damon Hill with 45 and Jean Alesi with 32. It was closer at the front of the Constructors' Championship, with Benetton and Williams separated by just six points (74 and 68, respectively), followed by Ferrari with 57.

Rounds 11 to 14[edit]

Qualifying for the Belgian Grand Prix took place in varying weather conditions and championship rivals Michael Schumacher and Damon Hill could only achieve sixteenth and eighth place on the grid, respectively. Ferrari's Gerhard Berger and Jean Alesi blocked out on the front row, but both retired during the race. Schumacher's teammate Johnny Herbert briefly led the race, but struggled for pace on the drying track. Hill took the lead after his teammate David Coulthard retired with gearbox issues, but then, as it was seen at least three times during the season already, Schumacher passed him during the round of pit stops. The story did not end there, however: the rain arrived and Hill made a second pit stop for rain tyres, while Schumacher tried to brave it out, at one point lapping six seconds slower than his rival. To make matters worse, he went off the track and the Williams took the lead until the rain stopped, the track dried, and the Benetton was back on top. When the safety car came out, the playing field was levelled and Schumacher led away from Hill, both on wet tyres. It looked like a thrilling battle to come, until the Brit was served a 10-second stop-go penalty for speeding in the pit lane. He did recover to second place, but finished far behind the German. Martin Brundle came home in a surprising third position. After the race, Schumacher was given a one-race suspended ban for defending too aggressively.[63]

Podium celebration after the Italian Grand Prix

On the formation lap of the Italian Grand Prix, pole-sitter David Coulthard spun off and retired with terminal damage. However, when the race was suspended after a first-lap collision in the same corner, with the track being blocked by four stranded cars, Coulthard was able to take the restart in a spare car, on pole position. Michael Schumacher and Gerhard Berger started behind him. On lap 13, Coulthard retired again, this time with a wheel bearing failure, and Schumacher crashed out when he was hit in the back by championship rival Damon Hill. After the incident, reminiscent of the one at Silverstone, Schumacher was furious with Hill, but calmed down when learning that the Brit had had to take evasive action when lapping Taki Inoue. The Ferraris were running 1-2 on home soil, until a TV camera on Alesi's rear wing fell off and destroyed Berger's suspension. With eight laps to go, the Frenchman also retired and handed a second victory to Benetton's Johnny Herbert. Mika Häkkinen (McLaren) and Heinz-Harald Frentzen (Sauber) achieved their best results yet in second and third, respectively. After the race, Hill was given a one-race suspended ban for his part in the collision.[64]

In Portugal, Coulthard started on pole position again and this time, he held on to achieve his first career win. Hill started in second, before Schumacher in third, but they finished the other way around. At the start, Ukyo Katayama in the Tyrrell made contact with Luca Badoer's Minardi and went airborne. After being extracted from the car, he was hospitalised for two days, suffering from a strained neck and bruising in several places.[65][66][67]

The European Grand Prix was held at the Nürburgring and saw Coulthard start on pole, ahead of teammate Damon Hill and championship leader Michael Schumacher. Coulthard did start in the spare car, however, after stalling his engine during his reconnaissance lap. Many teams decided to start on rain tyres, but Ferrari and McLaren switched to dries after the first start was abandoned. This only turned out to be the right decision after seventeen laps, when most other drivers had pitted. Schumacher and Hill battled again, switching positions several times, while Coulthard suffered from excessive oversteer and fell behind them. Meanwhile, Alesi was in the lead and extended his advantage to 45 seconds. During the second round of pit stops, however, he collided with Hill and had to pit for repairs. Berger retired with engine problems and Hill crashed out on lap 58. Schumacher passed Alesi for the lead, two laps from the end, and Coulthard completed the podium.[68][69][70]

With three races to go, Schumacher was leading the Drivers' Championship, 27 points ahead of Hill. This meant that the Williams driver needed to win all remaining races, with his Benetton rival scoring less than three points. In the Constructors' Championship, Benetton was leading Williams with 112 over 92 points.

Rounds 15 to 17[edit]

The F1 circus landed in Japan for two races, the first one dubbed the Pacific Grand Prix. Williams] driver David Coulthard achieved his fourth pole position in a row, ahead of teammate Damon Hill and championship leader Michael Schumacher in his Benetton. At the start, fourth-starting Jean Alesi got up to second place. After Schumacher overtook Hill and Alesi during the first round of pit stops, he closed in on the leader and lapped consistently faster, so that the German just came out in front after all pit stops were made.[69][71] Scoring his eighth victory of the season and gaining enough points to make it impossible for Hill to catch him, the Schumi was crowned the 1995 Drivers' Champion. He was the youngest double Drivers' Champion to date.

Schumacher did not settle down: he started on pole position for the Japanese Grand Prix. The Williams cars could not match the pace and made room for Jean Alesi and Mika Häkkinen in the top three on the grid. All drivers started on rain tyres, as it had rained in the morning and the track was damp, but it did not stop the champion from leading away. Both Ferraris were judged to have jumped the start and served a 10-second stop-go penalty. But Alesi was the first to switch to dry tyres and began making his way through the field. On lap 25, he was only six seconds behind leader Schumacher, when he had to retire with a driveshaft failure. When the rain arrived, but only on one edge of the circuit, teammates Hill and Coulthard crashed out in the same corner, one lap after each other.[72] Schumacher won and his teammate Johnny Herbert came home in third, earning Benetton the 1995 Constructors' Champions.

The final race of the season was held in Australia and saw most of the front-running cars retire, except for polesitter Damon Hill. David Coulthard crashed while entering the pit lane, Schumacher and Alesi collided, and Herbert and Berger retired with mechanical issues. Hill won, over two laps ahead of Ligier's Olivier Panis and Gianni Morbidelli in a Footwork, equalling Jackie Stewart's feat during the 1969 Spanish Grand Prix.[73]

Results and standings[edit]

Grands Prix[edit]

Round Grand Prix Pole position Fastest lap Winning driver Winning constructor Report
1 Brazil Brazilian Grand Prix United Kingdom Damon Hill Germany Michael Schumacher Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
2 Argentina Argentine Grand Prix United Kingdom David Coulthard Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
3 Italy San Marino Grand Prix Germany Michael Schumacher Austria Gerhard Berger United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
4 Spain Spanish Grand Prix Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Damon Hill Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
5 Monaco Monaco Grand Prix United Kingdom Damon Hill France Jean Alesi Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
6 Canada Canadian Grand Prix Germany Michael Schumacher Germany Michael Schumacher France Jean Alesi Italy Ferrari Report
7 France French Grand Prix United Kingdom Damon Hill Germany Michael Schumacher Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
8 United Kingdom British Grand Prix United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Johnny Herbert United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
9 Germany German Grand Prix United Kingdom Damon Hill Germany Michael Schumacher Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
10 Hungary Hungarian Grand Prix United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
11 Belgium Belgian Grand Prix Austria Gerhard Berger United Kingdom David Coulthard Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
12 Italy Italian Grand Prix United Kingdom David Coulthard Austria Gerhard Berger United Kingdom Johnny Herbert United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
13 Portugal Portuguese Grand Prix United Kingdom David Coulthard United Kingdom David Coulthard United Kingdom David Coulthard United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
14 Germany European Grand Prix United Kingdom David Coulthard Germany Michael Schumacher Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
15 Japan Pacific Grand Prix United Kingdom David Coulthard Germany Michael Schumacher Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
16 Japan Japanese Grand Prix Germany Michael Schumacher Germany Michael Schumacher Germany Michael Schumacher United Kingdom Benetton-Renault Report
17 Australia Australian Grand Prix United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Damon Hill United Kingdom Williams-Renault Report
Source:[74]

Points scoring system[edit]

Points were awarded to the top six finishers in each race as follows:[75]

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th 
Points 10 6 4 3 2 1

World Drivers' Championship standings[edit]

Pos. Driver BRA
Brazil
ARG
Argentina
SMR
Italy
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
FRA
France
GBR
United Kingdom
GER
Germany
HUN
Hungary
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
POR
Portugal
EUR
Germany
PAC
Japan
JPN
Japan
AUS
Australia
Points
1 Germany Michael Schumacher 1F 3F RetP 1P 1 5PF 1F Ret 1F 11 1 Ret 2 1F 1F 1PF Ret 102
2 United Kingdom Damon Hill RetP 1 1 4F 2P Ret 2P RetPF RetP 1PF 2 Ret 3 Ret 3 Ret 1PF 69
3 United Kingdom David Coulthard 2 RetP 4 Ret Ret Ret 3 3 2 2 RetF RetP 1PF 3P 2P Ret Ret 49
4 United Kingdom Johnny Herbert Ret 4 7 2 4 Ret Ret 1 4 4 7 1 7 5 6 3 Ret 45
5 France Jean Alesi 5 2 2 Ret RetF 1 5 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret 5 2 5 Ret Ret 42
6 Austria Gerhard Berger 3 6 3F 3 3 11 12 Ret 3 3 RetP RetF 4 Ret 4 Ret Ret 31
7 Finland Mika Häkkinen 4 Ret 5 Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret Ret 2 Ret 8 2 DNS 17
8 France Olivier Panis Ret 7 9 6 Ret 4 8 4 Ret 6 9 Ret Ret Ret 8 5 2 16
9 Germany Heinz-Harald Frentzen Ret 5 6 8 6 Ret 10 6 Ret 5 4 3 6 Ret 7 8 Ret 15
10 United Kingdom Mark Blundell 6 Ret 5 Ret 11 5 Ret Ret 5 4 9 Ret 9 7 4 13
11 Brazil Rubens Barrichello Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret 2 6 11 Ret 7 6 Ret 11 4 Ret Ret Ret 11
12 United Kingdom Eddie Irvine Ret Ret 8 5 Ret 3 9 Ret 9 13 Ret Ret 10 6 11 4 Ret 10
13 United Kingdom Martin Brundle 9 Ret 10 4 Ret Ret 3 Ret 8 7 Ret 7
14 Italy Gianni Morbidelli Ret Ret 13 11 9 6 14 Ret Ret 3 5
15 Finland Mika Salo 7 Ret Ret 10 Ret 7 15 8 Ret Ret 8 5 13 10 12 6 5 5
16 France Jean-Christophe Boullion 8 Ret Ret 9 5 10 11 6 12 Ret Ret 3
17 Japan Aguri Suzuki 8 Ret 11 6 Ret DNS 1
18 Portugal Pedro Lamy 9 10 Ret Ret 9 13 11 6 1
19 Italy Pierluigi Martini DNS Ret 12 14 7 Ret Ret 7 Ret 0
20 Japan Ukyo Katayama Ret 8 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret 10 Ret 14 Ret Ret 0
21 Brazil Pedro Diniz 10 NC NC Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 13 9 16 13 17 Ret 7 0
22 Italy Massimiliano Papis Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret 12 0
23 Italy Luca Badoer Ret DNS 14 Ret Ret 8 13 10 Ret 8 Ret Ret 14 11 15 9 DNS 0
24 Japan Taki Inoue Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 9 Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 8 15 Ret Ret 12 Ret 0
25 Italy Andrea Montermini 9 Ret Ret DNS DSQ Ret NC Ret 8 12 Ret DNS Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 0
26 France Bertrand Gachot Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret 8 0
27 Italy Domenico Schiattarella Ret 9 Ret 15 DNS 0
28 Austria Karl Wendlinger Ret Ret Ret 13 10 Ret 0
29 United Kingdom Nigel Mansell 10 Ret 0
30 Denmark Jan Magnussen 10 0
31 Netherlands Jos Verstappen Ret Ret Ret 12 DNS 0
32 Brazil Roberto Moreno Ret NC NC Ret Ret Ret 16 Ret Ret Ret 14 DNS 17 Ret 16 Ret Ret 0
33 Italy Gabriele Tarquini 14 0
34 Switzerland Jean-Denis Delétraz Ret 15 0
Italy Giovanni Lavaggi Ret Ret Ret Ret 0
Pos. Driver BRA
Brazil
ARG
Argentina
SMR
Italy
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
FRA
France
GBR
United Kingdom
GER
Germany
HUN
Hungary
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
POR
Portugal
EUR
Germany
PAC
Japan
JPN
Japan
AUS
Australia
Points
Source:[76]
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver Second place
Bronze Third place
Green Other points position
Blue Other classified position
Not classified, finished (NC)
Purple Not classified, retired (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Race cancelled (C)
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)
Withdrawn (WD)
Did not enter (empty cell)
Annotation Meaning
P Pole position
F Fastest lap


Notes:

  • † – Driver did not finish the Grand Prix but was classified, as he completed more than 90% of the race distance.

World Constructors' Championship standings[edit]

Benetton-Renault won the 1995 FIA Formula One World Championship for Constructors
Defending constructors' champion Williams-Renault placed second in the Constructors' Championship
Ferrari placed third in the Constructors' Championship
McLaren-Mercedes placed fourth in the Constructors' Championship
Ligier-Mugen-Honda placed fifth in the Constructors' Championship
Pos. Constructor No. BRA
Brazil
ARG
Argentina
SMR
Italy
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
FRA
France
GBR
United Kingdom
GER
Germany
HUN
Hungary
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
POR
Portugal
EUR
Germany
PAC
Japan
JPN
Japan
AUS
Australia
Points
1 United Kingdom Benetton-Renault 1 1F[e] 3F RetP 1P 1 5PF 1F Ret 1F 11 1 Ret 2 1F 1F 1PF Ret 137[e]
2 Ret 4 7 2 4 Ret Ret 1 4 4 7 1 7 5 6 3 Ret
2 United Kingdom Williams-Renault 5 RetP 1 1 4F 2P Ret 2P RetPF RetP 1PF 2 Ret 3 Ret 3 Ret 1PF 112[e]
6 2[e] RetP 4 Ret Ret Ret 3 3 2 2 RetF RetP 1PF 3P 2P Ret Ret
3 Italy Ferrari 27 5 2 2 Ret RetF 1 5 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret 5 2 5 Ret Ret 73
28 3 6 3F 3 3 11 12 Ret 3 3 RetP RetF 4 Ret 4 Ret Ret
4 United Kingdom McLaren-Mercedes 7 6 Ret 10 Ret 5 Ret 11 5 Ret Ret 5 4 9 Ret 9 7 4 30
8 4 Ret 5 Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret Ret 2 Ret 8 10 2 DNS
5 France Ligier-Mugen-Honda 25 8 Ret 11 9 Ret 10 4 Ret 6 Ret 3 Ret 8 7 Ret DNS Ret 24
26 Ret 7 9 6 Ret 4 8 4 Ret 6 9 Ret Ret Ret 8 5 2
6 Republic of Ireland Jordan-Peugeot 14 Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret 2 6 11 Ret 7 6 Ret 11 4 Ret Ret Ret 21
15 Ret Ret 8 5 Ret 3 9 Ret 9 13 Ret Ret 10 6 11 4 Ret
7 Switzerland Sauber-Ford 29 Ret Ret Ret 13 8 Ret Ret 9 5 10 11 6 12 Ret Ret 10 Ret 18
30 Ret 5 6 8 6 Ret 10 6 Ret 5 4 3 6 Ret 7 8 Ret
8 United Kingdom Footwork-Hart 9 Ret Ret 13 11 9 6 14 Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret 12 Ret Ret 3 5
10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 9 Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 8 15 Ret Ret 12 Ret
9 United Kingdom Tyrrell-Yamaha 3 Ret 8 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret 10 Ret 14 14 Ret Ret 5
4 7 Ret Ret 10 Ret 7 15 8 Ret Ret 8 5 13 10 12 6 5
10 Italy Minardi-Ford 23 DNS Ret 12 14 7 Ret Ret 7 Ret 9 10 Ret Ret 9 13 11 6 1
24 Ret DNS 14 Ret Ret 8 13 10 Ret 8 Ret Ret 14 11 15 9 DNS
11 Italy Forti-Ford 21 10 NC NC Ret 10 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 13 9 16 13 17 Ret 7 0
22 Ret NC NC Ret Ret Ret 16 Ret Ret Ret 14 Ret 17 Ret 16 Ret Ret
12 United Kingdom Pacific-Ford 16 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 15 Ret Ret 8 0
17 9 Ret Ret DNS DSQ Ret NC Ret 8 12 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
13 United Kingdom Simtek-Ford 11 Ret 9 Ret 15 DNS 0
12 Ret Ret Ret 12 DNS
Pos. Constructor No. BRA
Brazil
ARG
Argentina
SMR
Italy
ESP
Spain
MON
Monaco
CAN
Canada
FRA
France
GBR
United Kingdom
GER
Germany
HUN
Hungary
BEL
Belgium
ITA
Italy
POR
Portugal
EUR
Germany
PAC
Japan
JPN
Japan
AUS
Australia
Points
Source:[77]

Notes:

  • † – Driver did not finish the Grand Prix but was classified, as he completed more than 90% of the race distance.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Simtek team withdrew from the championship after the Monaco Grand Prix.
  2. ^ Despite being on the entry list, the Larrousse team did not contest any races.
  3. ^ The Pacific Grand Prix was originally due to take place on 16 April, but was postponed to 22 October due to the effects of the Great Hanshin earthquake in Japan.
  4. ^ All Formula One Grands Prix held at the Nürburgring since 1984 have used the 5 km (3.1 mi) long GP-Strecke and not the 21 km (13 mi) long Nordschleife, which was last used by Formula One in 1976.
  5. ^ a b c d Benetton scored 147 points and Williams scored 118 points, but neither team were awarded constructor points for Schumacher's win or Coulthard's second place in Brazil as both teams were deemed to be using illegal fuel.

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External links[edit]